March 16, 2015
by Jack Serio
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The “Real” Spring Break

What is everyone really up to during spring break?

This week marks a much needed week off for NYU students, and while many students (myself included) are looking forward to visiting home or exotic destinations, many students choose to stay in the city. This week we are exploring what they are up to and why they choose to stay here!

I sat down with a handful of Tisch students to find out what they’d be working on over their spring break.

Indigo Rancourt

I have a lot of rehearsals and meetings scheduled so that’ll take up some time. I’m going to the Met at some point, maybe MoMA. And I’m gonna see how long it takes me to walk from the bottom of Manhattan to the top!

Sabra Satz-Kojis

I’m starting work for an internship at a theatre company in midtown, which I’m really excited for! Besides that, I’ll just be seeing some theatre, catching up on TV I haven’t had time for, and hanging out with my mom when she comes in to the city

Nazareth Hagood

As far as homework goes, I’ve got a lot. I have to put the finishing touches on my WTE essay. I have to start attacking all the design work for my directing final. But I’m planning on going to Rhode Island from NY to see “The Glass Menagerie” at Trinity Rep. I have a few concerts in mind as well. I also wanna catch up on my tourist-y things. I’m asst. set designer for a show that goes up the week after spring break, too, so I’ll be working on that.

Whether you are staying in NYC to relax or catch up on your work, you are part of a community of many students who are hanging out in the city. One of the upsides to staying over break is enjoying how quiet campus is, maybe taking some time outside to read and relax.

Need some inspiration? Here are some things to do over spring break that are free!:

  • Check out all the free museums on iheartnymuseums.com.
  • Visit the Christopher St. piers (before dark).
  • Play with the Puppies on Stonewall Ave.
  • All of New York City’s 1700+ parks. Traverse to an obscure one.
  • Climb Moses Mountain on Staten Island.
  • Summer intern search.
  • Update your neglected blog.
  • Window shop.
  • Go outside and read a book for pleasure.
  • Sample food at Eataly or Chelsea Market.
  • Go to the Jamaica Bay Wildlife refuge.
  • Tan your face sitting in one of those swanky Highline chairs.
  • Watch epic handball matches in Coney Island.
  • Take New Jersey Transit to the Jersey Shore and make yourself a day trip “situation”.

March 13, 2015
by Mariangela Lardaro
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Tisch Open Arts Acting and Screenwriting Students Collaborate

Acting and screenwriting students.

Acting and screenwriting students.

Tisch Open Arts had its very first collaboration between acting and screenwriting students earlier this week. Students from Angela Pietropinto’s Open Arts acting studio, Acting for the Stage and Screen, read monologue scenes written by students in Shinho Lee’s course, Screenwriting Lab: Scene Study. Each reading was followed by a discussion about the character and story.

DSC07207Please visit the Tisch Special Programs website for more information about Tisch Open Arts. Check back with us soon for more about the collaboration from the students’ perspective!

March 12, 2015
by Justine Drayton
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Playwriting & Screenwriting in London Information Session Recap

A sweater is called a jumper in London

Need to check out at the store in London? Then you don’t go to the cash register. You go to the till.

Last night we hosted an information session for our Playwriting in London and Screenwriting in London programs. Our guest panel included Mary Jane Walsh, Tisch London program director, and recent alumni from the program, Maddie Hill (playwriting) and William Landman (screenwriting).

William Landman (far left) & Maddie Hill (center) speaking on their experiences

From left to right: William Landman, Maddie Hill, and Mary Jane Walsh.

A view of our audience

Prospective students from different majors attended the event, including drama, dramatic writing, and film and television. Our alumni enthusiastically shared their personal experiences from their time abroad, expressing the satisfaction they felt being absorbed in their script and play, from beginning to end. As former London student William stated, “This program was the best creative experience I have ever had during my time at NYU.” William and Maddie gave their peers helpful advice, from pitching their writing to how to save money while spending a semester in London.

William Landman & Mary Jane Walsh happily being reunited

William Landman & Mary Jane Walsh.

Couldn’t make our event? Don’t worry! We will be hosting another one in October 2015! If you’re thinking about applying to the Tisch Playwriting in London and Screenwriting in London programs, look out for the spring 2016 application which will be available this summer.

March 12, 2015
by Jack Serio
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Study Abroad: Berlin – What’s It All About – Part 2

This year Tisch Special Programs is launching a new study abroad program in Berlin where students will have the opportunity to work on exciting new multimedia art. With a young, creative population and an energetic, cosmopolitan art scene, Berlin has been enjoying a unique artistic revival that celebrates multimedia projects and unconventional spaces. Students will explore the city and develop multimedia projects. The program features two complementary courses: Creative Computing and Live Video Performance Art.

From fine art to computer programming, from live performance to animation, this workshop has applications across disciplines. There are no prerequisites, and the program welcomes students from all areas: e.g., film, music, computer science, dance, theater, fine art, multimedia, graphic design, performance art, photography etc.

Here is Part 2 of our interview series with Shawn Van Every who teaches Creative Computing in Berlin, to learn a little bit more about the program and what multimedia art is. Catch the first part of the interview with Max Nova here.

Can you tell us a little about yourself and what you do at NYU?

I am a full time faculty member in Tisch’s Interactive Telecommunications Program which is a 2 year Masters program in the creative and interactive use of technology. I teach a variety of courses in the realm of emerging media and technology. My courses typically focus on harnessing new technology for use in artistic or creative endeavors. For instance, one course that I teach involves students creating web based applications that utilize live audio and video conferencing technologies.

In short, why Berlin and what goes on at the study abroad program?

Berlin is a hotbed for the creative uses of new technology. Locating the course there allows for a great variety of guest lecturers and visits to events and performances around the city.

Who is this program for?

Anyone interested in how computation could be used to enhance their creative practice. In this case, the course will be skewed toward filmmakers and performers but in reality it could be people from any walk of life who are interested in creative uses of technology.

Talk to me a little about Multimedia Art, which is a relatively new field of study. What will students be learning in Berlin?

Students will learn how to effectively instruct a computer to do what they want it to. Along the way, we’ll explore the creative possibilities. In the end students could build anything such as a poetry writing twitter bot or a custom video filter or an application which triggers light changes when someone walks into a room.

What else will students have a chance to do in Berlin while they’re there?

In addition to being a European capital and having world class cultural offerings, Berlin has a lot going on in the realm of art and technology. I have a feeling that students will likely find that there is too much too do!

The application deadline for this program has been extended to March 15! To learn more about the program and the application click here.

March 11, 2015
by Justine Drayton
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Shakespeare in Performance at RADA Information Session Recap

Yesterday we had the pleasure of hosting an information session for our program Shakespeare in Performance at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA). Our guest panel included Geoff Bullen, course supervisor and RADA’s associate director, Mary Jane Walsh, Tisch London program director, and recent alumni from the program, Max Meyers, Bryce Lourie, and Aubrey Elenz.

Geoff Bullen (far left), Aubrey (second left), Bryce (center), & Mary Jane Walsh (far right)

Geoff Bullen (far left), Aubrey Elenz (second left), Bryce Lourie (center), & Mary Jane Walsh (far right)

Prospective students were engaged in the conversation about the training at RADA and opportunities that no city other than London could provide. Our alumni eagerly shared their personal experiences from their time abroad and the individualized attention they received in each of their classes. As Geoff said, “education is gained when there is a need to learn”.

Max (student alum, second left) engaging the students who were in attendance

Max (alumnus, second left) engaging the students who were in attendance

If you’re worried that you missed out on this session, have no fear, we will be hosting another one in October 2015! Thinking about applying to the Tisch RADA program? The application for Spring 2016 will be available this summer.

A glimpse of our audience members intently listening to the alum accounts of their time in the program

A glimpse of our audience members intently listening to the alumni accounts of their time in the program  

March 4, 2015
by Jack Serio
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March’s Must See Theatre & How You Can Produce It!

March’s Must See Theatre

& How You Can Start Producing

This week we are taking a look at all the great shows playing around town and how you can see them for cheap! But we are also going to look at what some of the first steps are to becoming a producer, so that one day you may be able to produce a Broadway show and end up on this list! Here we go!

BROADWAY:

Airline Highway

In the parking lot of The Hummingbird, a once-glamorous motel on New Orleans’ infamous Airline Highway, a group of friends gather. A rag-tag collection of strippers, hustlers and philosophers have come together to celebrate the life of Miss Ruby, an iconic burlesque performer who has requested a funeral before she dies. The party rages through the night as old friends resurface to pay their respects. Airline Highway is a boisterous and moving ode to the outcasts that make life a little more interesting. Written by Lisa D’Amour, the Pulitzer Prize-nominated Detroit, and helmed by the Tony-winning director of Take Me Out and Casa Valentina you won’t want to miss this show! It premiered in Chicago at Steppenwolf earlier this year and the buzz was huge! You can pick up your $27 Student Rush tickets 2 hours before the performance at the box office. More information here.

Toni-Martin-ensemble-Jacqueline-Williams-ensemble-Kate-Buddeke-Tanya-ensemble-member-K.-Todd-Freeman-Sissy-Na-Na-Carolyn-Braver-Zoe-and-Caroline-Neff-Krista

“Airline Highway”

 

Wolf Hall

Wolf Hall promises to be the most unique Broadway experience of the season! Comprised of two 2.5 hour plays (Part 1: Wolf Hall & Part 2: Bring Up The Bodies) audiences buy tickets to see this story told over the course of two nights or in the course of one day with a dinner break in between. The novels, by two-time Man Booker Prize winner Hilary Mantel, won multiple honors and became world-famous, best-selling sensations. The plays sold out at Stratford-upon-Avon and quickly transferred to London, where they received critical raves, broke box office records and triumphed as the West End’s biggest hit plays. Wolf Hall Parts One & Two is coming to Broadway for a strictly limited engagement! Performed in repertory, Hilary Mantel’s exhilarating stories of power and persuasion in Tudor England will transport audiences to the volatile court of King Henry VIII, where words cut like steel and the shadow of the Tower loomed over all. You can pick up your $27 (per show) student tickets at the box office prior to each performance. For information and performance schedule, click here.

wolf_hall

“Wolf Hall”

 

OFF-BROADWAY

The Nether

Produced by MCC (where this winter’s runaway hit Punk Rock was produced), The Nether promises to be one of the darkest and most thrilling shows you’ll see this season! There is a new immersive realm for the senses online, a virtual playground where those who plug in are coaxed into acting out their darkest fantasies–with no consequences in the “real” world. Or so it seems… until a young female detective begins an investigation to determine if there is a point at which thought or intention may actually constitute a crime within–and outside of–this new frontier. Winner of the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize, Jennifer Haley’s The Nether is a haunting thriller that will make you question when the fantastic becomes too real. You can pick up $25 (cash only) student tickets at the box office 30 minutes before curtain. More information here.

100232

“The Nether”

 

Josephine & I

Following a critically acclaimed run at London’s Bush Theatre, Olivier nominated actress and writer Cush Jumbo (Of this season’s The River) brings her tour de force one-woman show Josephine and I to The Public. Born into poverty in the slums of St. Louis, Josephine Baker became one of the most famous and groundbreaking stars of the 20th century. The first African-American performer to rise to international prominence, she was a French Resistance spy and civil rights activist who was married twice by age 16 and served as muse to Pablo Picasso, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, who called her “the most sensational woman anyone ever saw.” Now, nearly forty years after her death, Baker’s life inspires a young woman to face up to the sacrifices required to follow one’s dreams. You can buy your $25 student rush tickets in advance at The Public’s Box Office, click here for more information!

cush-jumbo-09

“Josephine & I”

Producing

Now let’s take a look at the financial end of theatre! Broadway shows take millions of dollars to get off the ground, and off-Broadway shows find themselves more modestly in the hundred of thousands of dollars. Either way there is a team of people on the back end finding and raising the money, and if you’re good at it, it can be a very lucrative profession. The producer finds the material, gathers the talent, oversees the fabrication of the work and steers it to the marketplace. It is the producer’s vision that marks him or her as an artist. The Producing Minor offered through Tisch Special Programs! Tisch is an ideal academic environment to train the creative producer as an artist. An interdisciplinary producer with a firm knowledge of the craft, a discerning eye for material, fundraising ability, a grasp of the law, cash-flow, people and ethics, is rare. The Producing Minor is a specialized track designed to provide students of any major with a framework for understanding the dynamics of producing as an art form and a business profession. Best of all you study producing in the field that interests you most, be that film or theatre. You can also study producing in London over the summer!

February 25, 2015
by Jack Serio
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Study Abroad: Berlin – What’s It All About?

Study Abroad: Berlin

What’s It All About?

Application Deadline is March 2nd!

This year Tisch Special Programs is launching a new study abroad program in Berlin where students will have the opportunity to work on exciting new multimedia art. With a young, creative population and an energetic, cosmopolitan art scene, Berlin has been enjoying a unique artistic revival that celebrates multimedia projects and unconventional spaces. Students will explore the city and develop multimedia projects. The program features two complementary courses: Creative Computing and Live Video Performance Art.

From fine art to computer programming, from live performance to animation, this workshop has applications across disciplines. There are no prerequisites, and the program welcomes students from all areas: e.g., film, music, computer science, dance, theater, fine art, multimedia, graphic design, performance art, photography etc.

We caught up with Max Nova who teaches Live Video Performance Art in Berlin, to learn a little bit more about the program and what multimedia art is.

Can you tell us a little about yourself and what you do at NYU?

I am a video artist, and I run a production company / art collective in Brooklyn called Dawn Of Man.

I’m an alum of Tisch UGFTV, and 4 years ago I wrote a course called “Live Video Performance Art,” based on my experience creating artwork in the music and event industries. The course is currently offered as an Open Arts course in Spring.

This year will mark the first time my course is offered as part of a study abroad program, and will be my first chance to travel to Germany!

Take a look at some of Max’s work with Dawn of Man below! It is incredible!

In short, why Berlin?

Students traveling to Berlin will have the amazing opportunity to experiment with live video mixing and projection mapping technology in one of the world’s hot spots for multi-media art.

Who is this program for?

This program is for artists of all kinds, especially those interested in installation and video art. A prior basic understanding of video editing will be very beneficial for anyone in this course.

Talk to me a little about Multimedia Art, a relatively new field of study, what will students be learning in Berlin?

The two courses in the multi media program are my course, “Live Video Performance Art,” as well as another course called “Creative Computing.”

This is a stellar combination that will give students a well rounded view of the history of the experimental moving images as it relates to contemporary multimedia art, as well as training in a plethora of new technical skills, including projection technology, VJ and projection mapping software, as well as basics in computer programing.

What else will students have a chance to do in Berlin while they’re there?

One of the most exciting parts of this program will be the opportunity to participate in a large-scale projection mapping installation at the St. Agnes, a gorgeous building on the NYU campus in Berlin.

 

The deadline for the trip is approaching fast! But, there is still time to apply! To learn more about the trip and the application click here.

 

February 25, 2015
by William Santagata
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A Tribute to Open Arts Professor Pennie DuPont

Last Sunday was the biggest night in Hollywood, with the esteemed Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences awarding Oscars to the best achievements in film during the year 2014. As always, several Tisch alumni were among the nominees. But it was a particularly special night for us in Special Programs to see one of our beloved Open Arts professors honored during the “In Memoriam” segment.

Pennie DuPont was the renowned casting director of such films as The Karate Kid (1984), Peggie Sue Got Married (1986), and Roxanne (1987). She taught the course Casting (now called Casting and Auditioning) in Open Arts , which I had the pleasure of taking in the spring 2011 semester. Through her warm and energetic personality, she taught us the behind-the-scenes wrangling that it takes to cast a movie: a feat that is not as simple as it appears. Given her accomplishments in the field, many Hollywood casting directors, agents, and managers were happy to visit the class to give insightful guest lectures. The result was a class that provided a wonderful experience and background into the inner machinations of the film and television industry.

Pennie passed away on June 13, 2014 at the age of 75. We at Special Programs are glad to have known her and were touched to see her peers in the industry honor her in last Sunday’s tribute.

Pennie_

Pennie DuPont

William Santagata is a Tisch alumnus and an Administrative Aide in the Office of Special Programs.

February 19, 2015
by Mariangela Lardaro
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Tisch Open Arts Faculty News

Tisch Open Arts faculty are often part of some exciting projects and are celebrated for their commitment to their community. Here’s the latest:

whose story is it revisedAviva Slesin

Aviva Slesin will be one of the award-winning filmmakers participating in Whose Story Is it? Perspectives in/on Documentary Storytelling. The event is sponsored by the Visual Arts Initiative, NYU Arts Council. The keynote speaker is Cynthia López, Commissioner, New York City Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment. Aviva Slesin is collaborating on this conversation about diverse documentary initiatives with Pegi Vail from the Center for Media, Culture and History and the Program in Culture and Media at the Graduate School of Arts and Science; Marcia Rock from NYU Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, Graduate School of Arts and Science; and Marco Williams from the Maurice Kanbar Institute of Film and Television, Tisch School of the Arts.  For event details, please visit the NYU Center for Media, Culture and History.

Aviva Slesin teaches the following courses in Tisch Open Arts: Master Class in Documentary: Director’s Series, Through the Documentary Lens: Civil Rights, Through the Documentary Lens: Contemporary Art, and Through the Documentary Lens: Human Rights. Read her bio.

hall-020915Patricia Hall
The Barclays Center is honoring Patricia Hall as a Black History Month honoree for her contributions to the people of and her service in the borough of Brooklyn, and Black and American History. She is part of Barclays’ first Black History Month Calendar.

Patricia Hall teaches Steps, Rhythm, and Movement: African Dance in Tisch Open Arts. Read her bio.

Alan Watson

Alan Watson is a choreographer and lead dancer with PMT Dance Company. Last week he was part of a secret flash mob proposal for Valentine’s Day.
As Alan told us, “Basically the entire concept was to trick one of our dancers in the PMT Dance Company that we got a gig doing a normal flashmob on the show. Little did she know, we created a fake ending, and rehearsed the real thing with her boyfriend in secret. She had no idea that her boyfriend joins us at the end and gets down on one knee.” It turns out the couple met at the PMT Dance Studio six years ago and have danced at the studio ever since. View the flash mob video.

AlanFlashAlan Watson teaches Steps, Rhythm, and Movement: Hip-Hop Dance in Tisch Open Arts. Read his bio.

 

 

The Tisch Open Arts Curriculum consists of a series of courses open to undergraduate and graduate students at New York University, including Tisch and non-Tisch students. These courses are specially designed to give introductory exposure, foundational knowledge, and hands-on experience in various artistic fields to students who are not majoring in the field of the course that is being offered. Please visit the Tisch Special Programs website for details.

February 18, 2015
by Jack Serio
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Investigating Studios : Playwright’s Horizons

phts_slide.jpg__960x480_q85_crop_upscale‘Investigating Studios’ will be a recurring segment where we talk with some of the drama students and learn a little bit more about the eight undergraduate studios. This week we spoke with some students at The Playwright’s Horizons Studio.

Meet The Cast:

Will B. from Chatham, NJ. (Freshman)

Jessica D. from Highland Park, IL. (Freshman)

Andy C. from Simsbury, CT. (Junior)

 

Questions:

What has your first semester at Playwright’s been like?

My first semester at Playwrights has been the most crazy and beautiful experience I’ve ever been privileged to have. I feel so lucky to be able to spend my time creating art. It’s been a really fulfilling time. – W.B.

Lovely and really fast-paced. I really have enjoyed learning just about every aspect of the theatre and I feel it has really helped me develop as a theatre artist. Learning all aspects of design, directing, playwriting, and performance has made me a much stronger collaborator. Playwrights has been fantastic about welcoming me to the community of young artists and I’ve made some of my best friends in the program. The first semester was intense and we never stopped moving but we created so much art, it was amazing. – J.D.

My first semester in Playwrights has been an enthralling experience. I’ve been exposed to numerous new experiences and have gained skills that I could not have imagined gaining from other studios. The experience in learning different design techniques and advancing my playwriting ability has really opened my eyes to potential skills that I didn’t think I had prior to coming here. – A.C.

How do you feel Playwright’s differs from the other studios?

At Playwrights, you get a truly holistic theatrical education. I didn’t really understand how important it is to comprehend many facets of theatre until I got to Playwrights. On top of that, I think we have our creativity challenged and strengthened every day by being asked to make things. Creativity is really nurtured and developed at Playwrights. – W.B.

Playwrights really is an education in theatre, not acting. We explore all aspects of the theatre and I think that best prepares us for working as theatre artists in today’s world. It’s really hard to market yourself as just an actor, you become a much better investment to a company if you can write, if you can design, if you know your way around a light board. We’re special because we’re held to a high standard of knowing a lot about a lot. – J.D.

Playwrights is the only studio at NYU that really lets you dig deep into creating devised work. The amount of collaboration and creativity involved in a day at Playwrights is astounding and pails to other studios who believe in more of an independent journey of self-discovery rather than a feeling of learning to work with the skills that a group processes to create the work. – A.C.

What’s the workload like? How are you managing?

The workload is heavy. I don’t have a real strategy with which I tackle my work. Mostly, I just live off of my passion for theatre. That’s the drive that keeps me going. – W.B.

The workload is pretty heavy, but is it really work if you love what you do? I manage by just not procrastinating and even then I have some pretty late nights but in the end all the work is making me a better artist! – J.D.

The work load is steep but not nearly as bad as I had been let on before coming here. Much of the difficulty of the workload is when to find time to meet with fellow studio members to work, as most of the assignments are more group oriented. However, once settled into a group and after a schedule has been made, the load is quite manageable. – A.C.

What’s your favorite class?

My favorite class has been Performance. Learning from two different teachers who approach acting with many different techniques has been really helpful to me. I have a larger toolbox now that I can draw from in my acting, which I believe is vital to have as an actor. I love having all of my tools as an actor, as opposed to being restricted to a single approach. – W.B.

Movement, easily, so much fun and Dan Safer and Mike Mikos are gods. – J.D.

Well, wanting to go into acting I would say Performance class but I’ve personally really fallen in love with Movement. I enjoy feeling myself being pushed to a physical limit and it’s helped me understand the sort of physicality that is required in much of the theater and performance being produced today. – A.C.

What’s your most challenging class?

My most challenging class has been Movement, but because of its rigor, it’s also been extremely rewarding. Contact improv opens you up in such a unique way, and it stretches both your body and your soul. – W.B.

Design because it’s the area of knowledge I have the least amount of knowledge, it’s definitely a challenge because I have to think in a completely different way than I’m used to. – J.D.

I find design class to be particularly difficult as it tends to have the most workload and the most unfamiliar work as well. Many times we are forced to trust our instincts and go out on a limb to achieve a lighting design or sound design, something that very few of us in class have ever done. It’s the class where the most risks are taken and that alone gives it a rather looming quality. – A.C.

What’s been your favorite show you’ve seen at Playwright’s Horizons (uptown)?

My favorite show at Playwrights uptown has been Pocatello. I think Sam Hunter is such a brilliant writer, and Pocatello had such a strong ensemble cast. It was an extremely cohesive piece. – W.B.

Bootycandy - J.D.

I actually haven’t seen one uptown yet but I’m sure I will be getting around to one this semester. – A.C.

Favorite place to eat in NYC?

I am all about The Smith. Great atmosphere and great food. And I’ll never turn down being served food in a skillet. – W.B.

Magnolia Bakery is DELICIOUS. – J.D.

Dos Toros on 4th ave between 13th and 14th street. It has been my favorite burrito place for the past two and half years I’ve lived in New York and I still make it a point to go by there every two weeks or so. IT honestly is the only place I’ve found that puts Chipotle to shame. – A.C.

 

Unless you’re the majoring in Dramatic Writing, most Tisch students don’t ever have the chance to dabble in playwriting like the students at Playwright’s Horizons do. However, through Special Programs’ fantastic study abroad program, Playwriting in London, students will gain an in-depth study of the structure; the beginning, middle, and end; originality; characters, conflict, imagery, and the pitch. Most importantly, you write a freshly conceived full-length play or two one-act plays while living in one of the most historic and theatrical cities in the world. Playwriting in London is also offered in both the fall and spring semesters! Although the deadline for Fall 2015 has already passed, Special Programs is still accepting applications for the Playwriting program so be sure to contact the office to find out more! To learn more about the program or other study abroad opportunities, click here or swing by the Tisch Special Programs office at 721 Broadway!

Not a Tisch student? Take a peak at the Open Arts course selections. Open Arts allows non-Tisch majors to take classes at Tisch. These courses are specially designed to give introductory exposure, foundational knowledge, and hands-on experience in various artistic fields to students who are not majoring in the field of the course that is being offered. And they are another great way to get your feet wet in playwriting without committing to a major. To learn more about Open Arts click here. Finally, Special Programs’ Summer in NYC program offers dramatic writing courses in playwriting, screenwriting, and television writing. Maybe it’s time to stay NYC a little longer this summer and get writing! Learn more about Summer in NYC here.